News Landing

    Extension News

    Articles published prior to March 2015 can be found here.
    The recent tragic loss of more than 550,000 acres of forest and thousands of homes in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, brings into focus the hazards that come with wildfire and its suppression and the risks firefighters take to protect life and property.
    Container gardening has become popular as planting areas in the landscape have become smaller. Some containers are used to grow vegetables or specimen shrubs, while others display a beautiful splash of color. For thrilling container gardens, consider these tips.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H youth will learn first-hand about the lawmaking process in a mock legislative session at the Utah State Capitol building on April 19.
    Determining when to plant a garden can be especially confusing in Utah's unpredictable, varied climate where last-frost dates can vary by many days within just a few miles. Many experienced gardeners have planted and later lost their plants to frost.
    Utah State University Equine Extension hosts a horse grooming clinic featuring professional groomer Elena Nuila on Saturday, April 30, at the USU Livestock Pavilion.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H recently hosted nearly 800 seventh grade students from the Cache County School District at the 4-H Healthy Living field trips held on the USU campus.
    In order to increase community support for refugees, Utah State University Extension faculty and students conducted a research project last year that examined the needs of the refugee population in Utah.
    In a recent article, financial guru Dave Ramsey identified the Top 10 things Americans wasted money on in 2015. His list includes: student loans, Ziosk tablets at restaurants, gym memberships, daily coffee trips, car payments, car leasing, car wash upgrades, name-brand household paper products, timeshares and shipping charges.
    As the snow melts, it becomes obvious that field mice, or voles, have damaged many lawns and ornamentals. During the winter, voles move about under the protection of snow cover and create unique surface runway systems with numerous burrow openings.
    Many foods freeze well and are great to have on hand for family meals. It may take a spring-cleaning event to get freezer compartments cleaned, organized and ready for more food, but it will be well worth the effort.
    The Utah State Legislature made a powerful statement that water conservation is a high priority and a critical part of future water management and planning. By approving ongoing funding for the Utah State University Extension Water Conservation Initiative, legislators cleared the way for increased applied research and outreach education for water conservation at the recent session.
    As a result of the growing popularity of sustainability, the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA) is providing $15,000 for the 2016 Extension Sustainability Summit April 5-7 in Portland, Ore.
    The Utah State University Extension office in Davis County will move to a new location within the next year, thanks to $1.2 million in funding from the Utah State Legislature at the recent legislative session.
    Leadermete is an educational conference for 4-H volunteers, staff and teens. It is designed to help 4-H volunteers and youth expand their knowledge and develop skills that can assist them in becoming engaged leaders in their clubs, their community, their country and the world.
    In order to increase community support for refugees, Utah State University Extension faculty and students conducted a research project last year that examined the needs of the refugee population in Utah.
    Utah State University Equine Extension will host an intro to dressage clinic featuring Jan Lawrence, dressage instructor for Millbrook Farms, located in Fairfield, Utah, on April 9 at the USU Equestrian Center.
    The PrestidigiTaters 4-H club from Washington County received the INSPIRE award, the highest honor of the competition. The INSPIRE award is given to the team that communicates their experience, enthusiasm and knowledge to other teams, their communities and the judges.
    Chances are high that the color green will be part of your St. Patrick’s Day in one form or another. Some people will go so far as to dye potatoes, pasta, milk or other foods green to make them colorful and festive.
    Even though filing a tax return may be far from the minds of college students who are studying for their next exam, realistically, more young adults are working while they attend college, even if it is only a summer job. This means they may be required by the IRS to file a return.
    As tax return season is fast approaching, you may have money coming your way. If you choose to spend it online, consider these tips to keep your personal information safe.
    Effective March 1, Sally Tauber, director of development at Utah State University's Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter in Park City, will join the university's Salt Lake City central advancement office to focus on corporate and foundational giving.
    Utah is home to three members of the deer family -- mule deer, moose and elk. In the spring and summer, deer typically inhabit higher elevations, then move to lower elevations in the fall and winter as snow depths increase. It is generally during these seasonal migrations on winter ranges that the potential for deer-human conflicts occur.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H youth from across the state recently travelled to Denver to compete in the 4-H Western National Roundup Conference. These youth, who had already succeeded at the county and state competitions, were able to test their skills against 4-H members from around the country.
    Many people miss having fresh garden produce in the winter so much that they are willing to grow it indoors. This can be a little challenging, but having fresh tomatoes on a sandwich or fresh peas on a winter salad makes it worth the effort.
    Dallin Bunnell, a Utah State University Extension 4-H youth from Utah County, was recently selected to be part of the 2016 National Design Team for the National 4-H Congress. He is the first youth from Utah to be selected.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H youth will learn first-hand about the lawmaking process in a mock legislative session at the Utah State Capitol building on April 19.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H recently hosted nearly 800 seventh grade students from the Cache County School District at the 4-H Healthy Living field trips held on the USU campus.
    The PrestidigiTaters 4-H club from Washington County received the INSPIRE award, the highest honor of the competition. The INSPIRE award is given to the team that communicates their experience, enthusiasm and knowledge to other teams, their communities and the judges.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H youth from across the state recently travelled to Denver to compete in the 4-H Western National Roundup Conference. These youth, who had already succeeded at the county and state competitions, were able to test their skills against 4-H members from around the country.
    Dallin Bunnell, a Utah State University Extension 4-H youth from Utah County, was recently selected to be part of the 2016 National Design Team for the National 4-H Congress. He is the first youth from Utah to be selected.
    Utah State University Extension Assistant Professor Paul Hill was named a recipient of the 2015 Governor's Medals for Excellence in Science and Technology. The awards are given to companies and residents who have provided distinguished service or made significant contributions to Utah's advanced scientific and technological knowledge, education and industry.
    A team of Utah State University Extension professionals was recently honored with a national award for developing an outstanding financial management program that helps youth make decisions and plan for their present and future financial needs.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H members from Cache, Wasatch and Utah counties recently attended the National Youth Maker Summit in Maryland, where they used their resourcefulness and creativity to build, invent and experiment.
    Utah State University Extension in Davis County was recently awarded a $315,700 federal grant to train adults so they can provide mental health support to youth through the Youth Mental Health First Aid (YMHFA) program. The grant comes from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
    This year marks the 11th year of the Utah State University Extension 4-H Meat Donation Program, and to date, the program has brought in more than 1 million pounds of meat and food items to Utah Food Bank for families in need.
    Members of the Utah State University Extension 4-H program recently participated in the National 4-H Partner Summit in order to showcase the work Utah 4-H is doing in computer science and technology development. Jessica Ivie, Utah 4-H state ambassador and a senior at Copper Hills High School, and Dave Francis, USU Extension 4-H youth development specialist, spoke on a panel to several stakeholders about their involvement in science, technology and engineering. Ivie developed a kit and curriculum to teach engineering and programming skills to youth. She has distributed over 2,000 of these kits and has enabled wider disbursement with investors from all over the world.
    Several Utah State University Extension 4-H professionals are the recent recipients of two national awards from the National Association of Extension 4-H Agents.
    Seth Duffin, Thayne Williams, Noah Lorimer and Brandon Murphy explored and completed hands-on activities in areas ranging from arts and crafts to engineering. They were accompanied by advisors Joel Duffin, Matt Lorimer and Dallin Graham.
    Taylor Boardman, a senior at Delta High School and a Utah State University Extension 4-H member, recently received the STEM Innovation Award from the Utah STEM Action Center for his accomplishments in technology and engineering.
    Utah State University Extension 4-H member Michael Isom recently applied for and received a $2,500 grant from the Utah STEM Action Center to support the Washington County 4-H Teen Council's participation in State 4-H Contests.
    The recent tragic loss of more than 550,000 acres of forest and thousands of homes in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, brings into focus the hazards that come with wildfire and its suppression and the risks firefighters take to protect life and property.
    Utah State University Equine Extension hosts a horse grooming clinic featuring professional groomer Elena Nuila on Saturday, April 30, at the USU Livestock Pavilion.
    The Utah State Legislature made a powerful statement that water conservation is a high priority and a critical part of future water management and planning. By approving ongoing funding for the Utah State University Extension Water Conservation Initiative, legislators cleared the way for increased applied research and outreach education for water conservation at the recent session.
    As a result of the growing popularity of sustainability, the United States Department of Agriculture National Institute of Food and Agriculture (USDA NIFA) is providing $15,000 for the 2016 Extension Sustainability Summit April 5-7 in Portland, Ore.
    Utah State University Equine Extension will host an intro to dressage clinic featuring Jan Lawrence, dressage instructor for Millbrook Farms, located in Fairfield, Utah, on April 9 at the USU Equestrian Center.
    Utah is home to three members of the deer family -- mule deer, moose and elk. In the spring and summer, deer typically inhabit higher elevations, then move to lower elevations in the fall and winter as snow depths increase. It is generally during these seasonal migrations on winter ranges that the potential for deer-human conflicts occur.
    The Qualified Water Efficient Landscaper (QWEL) program is well on its way to reducing Utah's water use even further as it partners with the Environmental Protection Agency's WaterSense program.
    Urban residents in Utah and other states are often waking up to the rasping calls and not-so-soothing coos of growing populations of feathered friends or in some cases, feathered fiends. Some of the new urban invaders may be native species that have traded inhospitable rural landscapes for the food and protection of urban parks, golf courses, cemeteries, green spaces and backyards.
    As Utah State University celebrates its 2015 Year of Water, USU Extension water outreach efforts continue to meet the needs of citizens in every corner of the state. Home to internationally recognized experts on water issues, USU is solving water challenges ranging from agricultural water management to ecosystem services to urban water use efficiency and conservation.
    Squash bugs do not like water. USU Extension Expert, Ron Patterson, demonstrates how to control squash bugs with water, and without using pesticides.
    Utah is the second driest state in the nation based on average annual precipitation, yet among the top per capita users of water. Utah State University Extension recently launched a website to link users to Extension water programs. USU Extension specialists are among the nation's leading experts on many water-related issues.
    Skylar Pond, an urban-community fishing pond in Willow Park, welcomed 44 new rainbow trout fingerlings on Monday as part of the Utah Trout in the Classroom program.
    Fruit producers in Utah now have access to a free weather data and pest management mobile app produced by the Utah Climate Center and the Utah State University Extension Integrated Pest Management Program.
    Governor Gary Herbert praised Utah State University efforts while signing an order to protect sage-grouse.
    Backyard Chicken Owners Need to Be Aware
    In a recent article, financial guru Dave Ramsey identified the Top 10 things Americans wasted money on in 2015. His list includes: student loans, Ziosk tablets at restaurants, gym memberships, daily coffee trips, car payments, car leasing, car wash upgrades, name-brand household paper products, timeshares and shipping charges.
    Many foods freeze well and are great to have on hand for family meals. It may take a spring-cleaning event to get freezer compartments cleaned, organized and ready for more food, but it will be well worth the effort.
    Chances are high that the color green will be part of your St. Patrick’s Day in one form or another. Some people will go so far as to dye potatoes, pasta, milk or other foods green to make them colorful and festive.
    Even though filing a tax return may be far from the minds of college students who are studying for their next exam, realistically, more young adults are working while they attend college, even if it is only a summer job. This means they may be required by the IRS to file a return.
    As tax return season is fast approaching, you may have money coming your way. If you choose to spend it online, consider these tips to keep your personal information safe.
    To make 2016 a great new year, challenge yourself to try these simple lifestyle changes each month. Each aspect of sustainable living presented is not only good for the environment, but good for your health and wallet as well.
    Research statistics on the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority's (FINRA) website show that eight in 10 individuals have been solicited about potentially fraudulent investment offers. Con artists are successful because they eliminate rational behavior and prey on your emotion. Financial fraud flourishes in Utah because of the strong entrepreneurial spirit and residents' tendency to trust others.
    Successful couples have learned to blend their money styles by being in harmony with the way they build a budget and spend money. So how do they do it?
    Designed as a date night for those who want to prepare for or strengthen their marriage, the marriage celebration features workshops presented by professionals from Northern Utah. Workshops include such topics as intimacy, communication and staying connected.
    The holidays are over, and you have a tired-looking poinsettia you are not sure what to do with. Be aware that your poinsettia can actually brighten your home for months to come with proper care and attention.
    Winter is here, and it is important to bundle up and be prepared for the cold weather. Your pipes are no different.
    Utah State University recently became the first college in Utah to join an initiative that unites universities to work toward increasing food security.
    According to the National Headache Foundation, people complain of a greater incidence of tension-type headaches and migraines between Thanksgiving and New Year's. Family stress, long lines and altered sleep and eating patterns play a key role. Consider these tips to reduce stress and tension this holiday season.
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Institute of Food and Agriculture and Food and Nutrition Service recently awarded $1 million to Carrie Durward, Utah State University Extension nutrition specialist and assistant professor of nutrition, dietetics and food sciences, for research on improving nutrition education for low-income families.
    It is estimated that each Thanksgiving, more than 46 million turkeys are prepared and eaten in the United States. Because of the number of turkeys prepared, the incidence of food-borne illness also increases during the holidays.
    Container gardening has become popular as planting areas in the landscape have become smaller. Some containers are used to grow vegetables or specimen shrubs, while others display a beautiful splash of color. For thrilling container gardens, consider these tips.
    Determining when to plant a garden can be especially confusing in Utah's unpredictable, varied climate where last-frost dates can vary by many days within just a few miles. Many experienced gardeners have planted and later lost their plants to frost.
    As the snow melts, it becomes obvious that field mice, or voles, have damaged many lawns and ornamentals. During the winter, voles move about under the protection of snow cover and create unique surface runway systems with numerous burrow openings.
    Many people miss having fresh garden produce in the winter so much that they are willing to grow it indoors. This can be a little challenging, but having fresh tomatoes on a sandwich or fresh peas on a winter salad makes it worth the effort.
    If you are looking for a useful gift for the gardeners on your shopping list, consider hand pruners or loppers. Hand pruners are similar to scissors, but are sturdier and are used to cut branches less than 1/2 inch thick.
    Spring-blooming bulbs are popular because of the beauty they add to the landscape and their ease of growing. Now is a good time to plant them, and many local retailers offer a wide variety.
    Thanksgiving Point Institute in Lehi, in cooperation with Utah State University Extension, was recently awarded a $136,186 Museums of America grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services, the federal agency that funds museums and libraries in the United States.
    After a long summer of growing and caring for a garden, the last thing gardeners want is to lose their plants to disease. Knowing the signs of common plant diseases and the steps to treat or prevent them is a valuable tool. Be aware of these common vegetable diseases this time of year.
    Most people have never experienced having their very existence depend on the foods they could harvest from their gardens or farms. However, in the past, many of our ancestors did it for survival. Currently, raising food has become a hobby for many, but with the uncertain economy, people have again begun planting larger gardens and more fruit trees as a way to stretch their budgets.
    Gardeners now have step-by-step instructions and information available at their fingertips with the recently released Gardeners Almanac: Timely Tips for the Yard and Garden mobile app from Utah State University Extension.
    Having a green lawn this time of year is difficult! Here are 10 tips which will help your lawn stay green.
    Large numbers of immature grasshoppers have been spotted in Utah this spring. The best time to control grasshoppers is when they are young, before they have wings and can fly away from insecticide treatments. For best results, organize your neighborhood or local farming/ranching community to work together to treat larger tracts of land.
    Water restrictions are in place in many cities in northern Utah, with more likely to follow. In most cases, though, landscapes and gardens can still be kept and enjoyed. Consider these suggestions for keeping your landscapes and gardens healthy while still saving water.
    Though recent storms may have already removed tree branches, it is still time to think pruning. There is probably no gardening task that generates as much fear in home gardeners as fruit tree pruning, and because of this, many homeowners want to ignore it. Consider these tips that will help take the pain out of fruit tree pruning.
    Most retailers do their best to stock nurseries with locally adapted plants. However, it seems most carry a few plants that struggle in our climate. Here are some tips to get the right plants for our Utah climate.
    The three steps include: Automate 1%, use the step-down principle, save a portion of your tax return.
    How to graft your scion wood to root stock.