Think Visual Impact When Readying Your Yard for Events

    Think Visual Impact When Readying Your Yard for Events

    June 7, 2018

    Ask an Expert: Think Visual Impact When Readying Yard for Events

    Question: Our yard has been a little neglected, but our neighbors asked us to host an event this summer. What are the most important things we can do to make our yard look nice in a time crunch?

    For a special event like this when time is short and appearances are important, focus on the areas where your guests will be mingling that will have the greatest visual impact. Work later on areas not as likely to be seen and used, if timeflower work allows. As you walk through your yard, follow the same route you expect guests to use, and make a note of problems or neglected areas that catch your attention. Once you’ve done that, you’re ready to go to work. In addition to the problem areas, start with these tasks:

      Rake leaves and debris, and cut back the dead tops of perennials.

      Pull weeds and edge the lawn around your walkways and flower beds. A nice,         crisp edge makes a great impact on the appearance of the area. You will probably need to touch up the edging a day     or two before the event.

      One last task that will help your yard look “put together” is to add a 3-inch layer of mulch over the soil in your shrub       and flower beds. Small or mini bark nuggets are generally more visually pleasing than shredded bark or large bark         nuggets.

    These tasks will provide the most visual impact. Once you have tackled them, you can move on to other areas if there is still time.

      If you have a fence, dust off cobwebs. Solid fences also benefit from a good rinse with a hose.

      Prune low-hanging or head-height branches in the entry and mingling areas. Don’t just cut back branches. Instead,       cut off small branches growing downward from the branch underside. That will preserve the natural form and beauty     of your trees while providing clearance for your taller guests.

     • Since annual flowers can take several weeks to fill in and bloom, consider adding color with container gardens and       hanging baskets that are already in bloom. Large containers and hanging baskets on shepherd’s crooks can also be     used to direct foot traffic during the party.

    Discover new ideas for your yard and garden at USU Extension’s Hidden Garden Tour on June 15 and 16. For information, visit www.hiddengarden.org or call (801)-851-8469.

    Answer by: Meredith Seaver, Utah State University Extension Horticulture Assistant, Utah County, 801-851-8462, gardenhelp@usu.edu

    Published on: Jun 08, 2018

    Related Articles

    USU Extension Professor Raising Mental Health Awareness, Invited to National Meeting

    USU Extension Professor Raising Mental Health Awareness, Invited to National Meeting

    A Utah State University Extension assistant professor and two teen council members recently attended the Well Being Legacy Convening, an exclusive gathering of top national, regional and community leaders who are working to improve their communities and produce life-changing results.

    Read More
    USU Extension Hosts Start-To-Farm Workshop In Logan

    USU Extension Hosts Start-To-Farm Workshop In Logan

    Utah State University Extension sponsors a farming workshop on September 10 and 11 at the Eccles Conference Center on the USU Logan campus. The workshop will run from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on September 10 and from 9 a.m. to noon on September 11. Speakers from academia, industry and federal agencies will discuss business planning and resources, direct and target marketing strategies, federal grant and loan programs, site selection, soil and water considerations, crop selection and seasonal considerations, and product pricing and distribution strategies.

    Read More
    USU Extension Issues Codling Moth Advisory for Cache County

    USU Extension Issues Codling Moth Advisory for Cache County

    Utah State University Extension in Cache County issues a fruit pest advisory for codling moth this weekend, June 1-3. The codling moth, which affects apples and pears by causing wormy fruit, is one of Utah's most troublesome insect pests. It damages fruit by tunneling in to feed on the developing seeds; and since most backyard growers are not keen on having that extra protein in their fruit, it is important to know when and how to take action.

    Read More