USU Extension Issues Codling Moth Advisory for Cache County

    USU Extension Issues Codling Moth Advisory for Cache County

    May 31, 2018 

    USU EXTENSION ISSUES WEEKEND CODLING MOTH ADVISORY FOR CACHE COUNTY

    Utah State University Extension in Cache County issues a fruit pest advisory for codling moth this weekend, June 1-3. The codling moth, which affects apples and pears by causing wormy fruit, is one of Utah’s most troublesome insect bugpests. It damages fruit by tunneling in to feed on the developing seeds; and since most backyard growers are not keen on having that extra protein in their fruit, it is important to know when and how to take action.

    USU Extension researchers trap and monitor the codling moth closely in order to understand its life cycle so they can inform the public about the most effective timing for control. For this year’s growing season in most areas of Cache Valley, peak egg laying (and the most critical time to protect fruit) is this weekend. The codling moth emerges when apples are in full bloom. They then begin mating and laying eggs near the small fruit about 3 weeks after bloom. Because the insects are cold blooded, their development is dependent on local temperatures, which vary from year to year. They will typically produce two to three generations a season.

    Control options focus primarily on protecting the fruit throughout the growing season. A few commonly sold chemicals for codling moth control are horticultural oil (to smother eggs), malathion, carbaryl and acetamiprid. However, other lower-toxicity/organic options are also available. For more information, visit:https://tinyurl.com/yaat39gm.

    USU Extension provides timely pest advisories to the public throughout the growing season. To receive the advisories via email, subscribe at: https://pestadvisories.usu.edu/.

    Writer: Julene Reese, 435-757-6418, julene.reese@usu.edu
    Contact: JayDee Gunnell, 435-752-6263, jaydee.gunnell@usu.edu

    Published on: Jun 01, 2018

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