Changes in Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter Staff

    Changes Made in Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter Staff

    Michelle MerrillEffective March 1, Sally Tauber, director of development at Utah State University’s Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter in Park City, will join the university’s Salt Lake City central advancement office to focus on corporate and foundational giving.

    “Sally has made many wonderful contributions to the Swaner EcoCenter during an exciting time of growth for the organization,” said Nell Larson, the center’s executive director. “We’re going to miss Sally at the EcoCenter, but know that she’ll continue to do great things for the university in her new role.”

    Tauber joined the Swaner staff in 2008, the same year that the organization opened the LEED Platinum-certified EcoCenter. Swaner gifted itself to USU in 2010 and Tauber has been involved in a variety of development efforts there, all in support of the center’s programs and mission. The organization preserves and actively restores a 1,200 acre nature preserve to enhance water quality and wildlife habitat, while providing a large number of educational opportunities for the community. As one of many USU Extension sites, the EcoCenter hosts school field trips, summer camps and classes for children as well as lectures and specialty tours for adults. Guests may also hike or snowshoe on the preserve, and many people explore geocaching opportunities there.

    USU Vice President for Advancement and Commercialization, Robert Behunin said, “We are excited to bring Sally’s experience and talents to the university’s central development team.”  

    Michelle Merrill, director of development for USU Extension, will now oversee development efforts for the Swaner Preserve and EcoCenter. Ken White, Vice President for Extension, said “Michelle has done a great job with the USU Botanical Center and Ogden Botanical Gardens.  We are confident the Swaner Board and donors will love working with her.”

    Merrill can be reached at Michelle.Merrill@usu.edu.

    Published on: Mar 03, 2016

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