List of Ingredient Substitutions for Cooking and Baking

It is frustrating to be in the middle of a baking project and find you are missing a key ingredient. Before making a trek to the grocery store, remember that your cupboards may still hold options. A recipe substitution can sometimes alter the flavor, color, texture or volume of the food, but will still result in an acceptable finished product. The following is a list of ingredient substitutions.

Baking powder, 1 teaspoon. Substitute with 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 5/8 teaspoon cream of tartar; or 1/4 teaspoon soda plus 1/2 cup fully soured milk or buttermilk; or 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 1/2 tablespoon vinegar or lemon juice used with milk to make 1/2 cup; or 1/4 teaspoon baking soda plus 1/4 to 1/2 cup molasses. (Note about molasses in order for carbon dioxide to be released and cause the product to rise, an acid ingredient must be present to react with the soda. Molasses is acidic enough that it releases carbon dioxide.)

Yeast, active dry, 1 tablespoon. Substitute with 1 package active dry yeast; or 1 compressed yeast cake.

Whole egg, raw, 1 large. Substitute with 2 egg yolks; or 3 tablespoons plus 1 teaspoon thawed frozen egg; or 2 tablespoons and 2 teaspoons dry whole egg powder plus an equal amount of water. Equivalents1 large egg = 3 T.; 5 large = 1 cup.; 6 medium = 1 cup.

Cream, half & half (12-16% fat), 1 cup. For use in cooking and baking, substitute with 7/8 cup milk and 3 tablespoons butter or margarine; or 1 cup evaporated milk, undiluted.

Cream, heavy (36-40% fat), 1 cup (2-2 1/2 cups whipped). For use in cooking and baking, substitute with 3/4 cup milk and 1/3 cup butter or margarine.

Milk, 1 cup. Substitute with 1/3 cup instant nonfat dry milk plus 1 cup minus 1 tablespoon water; or 3 tablespoons sifted regular nonfat dry milk plus 1 cup minus 1 tablespoon water.

Milk, sweetened, condensed, 1 can = 1 1/3 cup. Substitute with 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons dry milk plus 1/2 cup warm water; mix well, add 3/4 cup sugar and 3 tablespoons melted butter or margarine. Stir until smooth. Or 1/3 cup plus 2 tablespoons evaporated milk, 1 cup sugar and 3 tablespoons melted butter or margarine. Heat and stir until sugar and butter dissolve.

Buttermilk or sour milk, 1 cup. Substitute with 1 tablespoon vinegar or lemon juice plus enough milk to make 1 cup. Let stand 5 minutes. Or 1 3/4 teaspoons cream of tartar plus 1 cup milk; or 1 cup plain yogurt.

Sour cream, 1 cup. Substitute with 1 cup plain yogurt; or 7/8 cup sour milk plus 1/3 cup butter.

Granulated sugar, 1 cup. Substitute with 1 cup corn syrup, 1 cup molasses or 3/4 cup honey (decrease liquid called for in recipe by 1/4 cup); or 1 cup brown sugar, firmly packed. For each cup of honey in baked goods, add 1/2 teaspoon soda. Equivalent1 pound granulated sugar = 2 1/4 cups. See the Shelf life of 5 Commonly Used Sugars and How to Store Them 

Brown sugar, 1 cup (firmly packed). Substitute with 1 cup granulated sugar. Equivalent1 pound brown sugar = 2 1/4 cups firmly packed.

Corn syrup, 1 cup. Substitute with 1 cup sugar plus 1/4 cup water.

Honey, 1 cup. Substitute 1 1/4 cups sugar plus 1/4 cup water.

Flour used as thickener, 1 tablespoon. Substitute with 1/2 tablespoon cornstarch, potato starch, rice starch or arrowroot starch; or 1 tablespoon quick-cooking tapioca.

Flour is a pantry staple that is always worth keeping on hand and buying in bulk. Check out the article What is the Shelf Life of Flour? 6 Commonly Used Flours

All-purpose flour, 1 cup sifted. Substitute with 1 cup unsifted all-purpose flour minus 2 tablespoons; or 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons cake flour. Equivalent1 pound = 4 cups sifted or 3 1/3 cups unsifted.

Shortening, solid, 1 cup. For use in baking, substitute with 7/8 cup lard; or 1 1/8 cups butter or margarine (decrease salt in recipe by 1/2).

Shortening, melted, 1 cup. Substitute with 1 cup cooking oil.

Cooking oil, 1 cup. Substitute with 1 cup melted shortening.

Butter, 1 cup. Substitute with 1 cup margarine; or 7/8 to 1 cup hydrogenated fat plus ½ teaspoon salt; or 7/8 cup lard plus ½ teaspoon salt; or 4/5 cup bacon fat, clarified; or 3/4 cup chicken fat, clarified; or 7/8 cup oil.

Allspice, 1 teaspoon. Substitute with 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves.

Pumpkin pie spice, 1 teaspoon. Substitute with 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon ginger, 1/8 teaspoon allspice and 1/8 teaspoon nutmeg.

Chocolate, 1 ounce. Substitute with 3 tablespoons cocoa plus 1 tablespoon fat.

Semisweet chocolate, 1 ounce. Substitute with 1/2 ounce baking chocolate plus 1 tablespoon sugar.

Cocoa, 1/4 cup or 4 tablespoons. Substitute with 1 ounce (square) unsweetened chocolate (decrease fat called for in recipe by 1/2 tablespoon).

Cornstarch (for thickening), 1 tablespoon. Substitute with 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour; or 2 tablespoons granular tapioca.

Lemon juice, 1 teaspoon. Substitute with 1/2 teaspoon vinegar.

On occasion, we all will face an emergency sitiation so it is important to consider and have indoor safe emergency cooking solutions so that you can cook even without power, know how to boil water without electicity, and even how to stay warm during a power outage

For a more comprehensive list of 95+ ingredient substitutions with a searchable table visit this article - List of Common Ingredient Substitutions for Cooking and Baking. Also if you are interested in milling your own flour for baking visit this article - Best Grain Mills (Wheat/Flour Grinders), Ultimate Buyers Guide.
Has your rice gone bad? What is the shelf life of rice? See the article - Shelf Life of the 14 Most Commonly Used Rice.

By: Georgia Laurtizen