Expanded Food & Nutrition Education Program

The Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is designed to assist limited resource audiences in acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and changed-behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets, and to contribute to their personal development and the improvement of the total family diet and nutritional well-being.

About EFNEP

The CSREES' Expanded Food and Nutrition Education Program (EFNEP) is a unique program that currently operates in all 50 states and in American Samoa, Guam, Micronesia, Northern Marianas, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. It is designed to assist limited-resource audiences in acquiring the knowledge, skills, attitudes, and changed behavior necessary for nutritionally sound diets, and to contribute to their personal development and the improvement of the total family diet and nutritional well-being.

Adult EFNEP

Through an experiential learning process, adult program participants learn how to make food choices which can improve the nutritional quality of the meals they serve their families. They increase their ability to select and buy food that meets the nutritional needs of their family. They gain new skills in food production, preparation, storage, safety and sanitation, and they learn to better manage their food budgets and related resources from federal, state, and local food assistance agencies and organizations.  They also may learn about related topics such as physical activity and health.  EFNEP is delivered as a series of 10-12 or more lessons, often over several months, by paraprofessionals (peer educators) and volunteers, many of whom are indigenous to the target population. The hands-on, learn-by-doing approach allows the participants to gain the practical skills necessary to make positive behavior changes. Through EFNEP, participants also experience increased self-worth, recognizing that they have something to offer their families and society.

Youth EFNEP

The delivery of EFNEP youth programs takes on various forms. EFNEP provides nutrition education at schools as an enrichment of the curriculum, in after-school care programs and through 4-H EFNEP clubs, day camps, residential camps, community centers, neighborhood groups, and home gardening workshops. In addition to lessons on nutrition, food preparation, and food safety, youth topics may also include related topics, including physical activity and health.

Program Delivery

County Extension family and consumer science professionals provide on-the-job training and supervise paraprofessionals (peer educators) and volunteers who teach EFNEP. Paraprofessionals usually live in the communities where they work. They recruit families and receive referrals from current and former participants, neighborhood contacts and community organizations and agencies. Examples of referral sources are local schools and businesses, workforce preparedness and health and wellness centers, nonprofit and faith-based organizations and local Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and WIC offices.  Methods for program delivery may include direct teaching in group or one-to-one situations; mailings and telephone teaching to complement other teaching methods; mass media efforts to develop understanding, awareness, and involvement in the educational program; and development and training of volunteers to assist with direct teaching of adults and youth.

FY 2007-2008 Outcomes and Impacts

In 2007 Utah EFNEP achieved its highest percentage (98.9%) of positive changes in dietary improvement.  Figure 1 shows the comparison of impact between the past five years.  We will continue to exceed our goal set at 85%.

Figure 1  Percent with positive changes in any food groups at exit (2003-2007).

The following shows a brief summary of the program outcom:within each county)
Total FTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = 9.5 (2.15 Professional staff, 7.35 Paraprofessional staff)
Total NEAs  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = 14 (12 in 2006)
Total graduates  . . . . . . . . . . . . . = 616 (50.2% increase from 410 graduates in 2006)
Total families  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = 766 (27.9% increase from 599 in 2006)
Total number persons in 
   program families  . . . . . . . . . .  = 2,609 (15.8% increase from 2,253 in 2006)
Total youth  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . = 10,311 (32.8% increase from 7,764 in 2006)

Total counties served . . . . . . . . = 3 (Expanded outreach areas e in FY 2007

Positive Behavioral Changes

1.  90.5% of participants showed improvement in one or more nutrition practices (i.e., plans meals, makes healthy food choices, prepared food without adding salt, reads nutrition labels or has children eat breakfast.

2.  85.0% of participants showed improvement in one or more food resource management practices (i.e., plans meals, compares prices, does not run out of food or uses grocery lists.

3.  60.5% of participants showed improvement in one or more of the food safety practices (i.e., thawing and storing foods properly).

Food Dollars and Healthcare Cost Saved
Money spent on food per person per month among graduates dropped by 3.3%.  Estimated healthcare cost saved in Utah is $4,078,258.80.