family & consumer science

Apple Green Chile Butter

Yield: 6 half-pints
 
4 lb golden delicious apples, cored but unpeeled
3 c frozen chopped green chile (mild, medium, or hot), thawed and drained
2 c bottled apple juice or apple cider
2 c packed brown sugar
2 c granulated sugar
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1 tsp. ground allspice
 
Cut the apples into quarters. Combine apples, green chile, and apple juice or cider in a 6- to 8-quart non-stick pan. Bring mixture to a boil; reduce heat and simmer until apples are soft, about 20 minutes. Remove from heat. Ladle mix­ture into food processor in batches, processing until smooth. Strain mixture by pressing through a sieve and return the purée to pan. Add both types of sugar, the cinnamon, and allspice. Bring the mixture to a boil over medium heat, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat if necessary to prevent boiling over. Cover pan and boil mixture until thick enough to round on a spoon, about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally at the beginning and constantly toward the end of the cooking period to prevent sticking and burning. Remove from heat. Ladle hot butter into hot jars, leaving a 1/4-inch headspace. Attach two-piece lids. Pro­cess in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes, ad­justing processing time for elevation as necessary.
 
Tomato Green Chile Pineapple Preserves
Yield: 6 half-pints
 
1 lb ripe slicing-type tomatoes powdered pectin
2 c frozen chopped green chile (mild, medium, or hot), thawed and drained
1 20-oz can crushed pineapple in juice, not drained
1 1.75-oz package powdered pectin
6 c granulated sugar
 
Wash tomatoes. Immerse tomatoes in boiling water for 30 seconds. Remove and plunge into cold water. Slip off skins. Process peeled tomatoes in a food processor for 1 minute. Combine puréed tomatoes, green chile, pineapple, and pectin in an 8-quart non-stick pan. Bring mixture to a full boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. Add sugar all at once. Return mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Boil hard for 1 minute. Remove from heat. Skim off foam if necessary. Ladle hot pre­serves into hot jars, leaving a 1/4-inch headspace. Attach two-piece lids. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes, adjusting processing time for elevation as necessary.
 
Raspberry Green Chile Jam
Yield: 7 half-pints
 
 
4 c frozen raspberries
3 c frozen chopped green chile (mild, medium, or hot), thawed and drained
1 1.75-oz package powdered pectin
1 c water
1 tbsp bottled lemon juice
6 c granulated sugar

Combine raspberries, green chile, pectin, wa­ter, and lemon juice in an 8-quart non-stick pan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, stirring constantly. Add sugar all at once. Return mixture to a boil, stirring constantly. Boil hard for 1 min­ute. Remove from heat. Ladle hot jam into hot jars, leaving a 1/4-inch headspace. Attach two-piece lids. Process in a boiling water bath for 10 minutes, adjusting processing time for elevation as necessary.

 

Look for more at:  http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/.

 

Common Food Preservation Questions and Answers

USU Steam Canning Position Statement 

 

Remaking Jams and Jellies

 

Tested Salsa Recipe and guidelines from Dr. Brian Nummer, Food Safety Specialist at USU

 

Other Salsa Recipes

 

Using Tomatoes After a  Frost
      It happens every year. There are always some ripe and semi-ripe tomatoes left on the vine that get caught in the first frost of the fall. One of the concerns that people have is whether these tomatoes can be used for canning. The recommendation is not to can tomatoes from frost-killed vines. This may result in an unsafe product because of the potential low acidity of the tomatoes on frost-killed vines.

     It's best to pick your tomatoes before the first frost and ripen them indoors. Tomatoes that have turned light green or pink will ripen satisfactorily indoors. Anything greener can be used for frying, relish, salsa, etc. Green tomatoes can be safely canned if you follow the USDA recommendations.

     To ripen tomatoes, keep them out of direct sunlight. Room temperature should be between 60 and 70 degrees F. If the temperature falls below 55 degrees F, flavor will suffer. Fruit should be checked daily for decay or rotting. To prevent the spread of decay, the fruit may be wrapped individually in tissue paper. The damaged fruit should be disposed of as soon as it is noticed.

     If you did not pick your tomatoes before the first frost, a safe option is to freeze the tomatoes, after cutting away/removing "bad spots" or blemished areas. Tomato juice and stewed tomatoes can be frozen successfully in freezer containers, leaving at least 1-1/2 inch headspace. For the best flavor use these products within 8 to 12 months. Whole tomatoes can be frozen for cooking if you plan on using them within 3 months. The skins may be tough, so it is recommended that you peel the tomatoes and freeze them in freezer containers or freezer bags.

     For more information call your local Extension office or visit Ripening Tomatoes and Green Peppers Indoors and Freezing Tomato Products
Reference:  University of Minnesota Extension

 

 

See Extension publications for more information by clicking on More< in each category. 

**NOTE:  The following processing times/pressures have been adjusted for 4300-4500 foot elevations--altitude adjustments.

Apples

Harvest: Sep 15 - Nov 1

Process pints and quarts in a boiling water bath:

     30 mins

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Apricots

Harvest: July 10 – 24

Process hot pack in a boiling water bath: 

     Pints – 30 mins     Quarts – 35 mins

Process cold pack in a boiling water bath:

     Pints – 35 mins     Quarts – 40 mins

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Beets

Harvest:  July 15 - Sep 15

Process in a pressure canner:

     Dial gauge: Pints – 30 mins @ 13 lbs    

          Quarts – 35 mins @ 13 lbs

     Weighted-gauge: Pints – 30 mins @ 15 lbs  

          Quarts – 35 mins @ 15 lbs

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Berries

Harvest: Strawberries; June 5 – Sep 20

               Raspberries; July 4 – Sep 20

Process hot pack pints and quarts in a boiling  

     water bath: 20 mins

Process raw berries in a boiling water bath:

     Pints – 20 mins     Quarts – 30 mins

More<

Freezing Fruit

To preserve quality the fruit should be frozen in moisture-vapor proof packages. Ascorbic acid, citric acid and steam can all be used as pretreatments to preserve the color of the fruit. Citrus fruits can be stored for 3-4 months. All other fruits can be stored for 1 year.

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Green Beans

Harvest: July 4 – Oct 10 

Process in a pressure canner:

     Dial gauge: Pints – 75 mins @ 13 lbs     

          Quarts – 90 mins @ 13 lbs

     Weighted-gauge: Pints – 75 mins @ 15 lbs    

          Quarts – 90 mins @ 15 lbs

More<

Peaches

Harvest: July 24 – Sep 20 

Process in a boiling water bath:

     Pints – 35 mins     Quarts – 40 mins

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Pears

Harvest: Sep 1 – 15 

Process in a boiling water bath:

     Pints – 35 mins     Quarts – 40 mins

More<

Tomatoes

Harvest: July 24 – Oct 1

Process whole tomatoes in pints or quarts in a

     boiling water bath: 95 mins

Process tomato sauce or juice in a boiling   

     water bath: Pints – 45 mins    

                           Quarts – 50 mins

Add lemon juice to each bottle...2 Tbsp/quart, 1 Tbsp/pint

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