USU Extension Low-Water Landscaping Book Timely

    USU Extension Low-Water Landscaping Book Timely

    April 13, 2018

    USU Extension Low-Water Landscaping Book Timely


    At a time when city officials along the Wasatch Front are already encouraging residents to cut back on water due to reduced snow and spring runoff, Utah State University Extension’s “Combinations for Conservation” book offers help. The landscaping book provides examples of plant combinations that have been successful in low-water gardens throughout the Intermountain West.

    Authors are Adrea Wheaton, Larry Rupp, David Anderson, Paul Johnson, Roger Kjelgren, Kelly Kopp, Anne Spranger and William Varga, all USU Extension plant and landscape specialists.

    “There are many plant books that list a variety of drought-tolerant plants suitable for water-conserving landscapes,” said Wheaton. “However, many homeowners are often intimidated by the information and unsure of how to put them together. This book is designed to give homeowners and designers the confidence to create beautiful, low-water landscapes.”

    The book contains over 100 tried-and-true plant combinations discovered in gardens throughout the Intermountain West. Design issues such as dry shade and hot planting strips are addressed, and the book is organized so that plant combinations are grouped together by water requirements. There are also tips throughout the book about conserving water and efficient irrigation, which will be beneficial with this year’s water concerns.

    Cost of the book is $25 and is available through USU Extension at usuextensionstore.com/ and at many county Extension offices throughout Utah. The website also offers a book on water-wise landscaping as well as other gardening and plant guides. 

    Writer: Julene Reese, 435-757-6418

    Contact: Adrea Wheaton, 435-797-5529, adrea.wheaton@usu.edu

    Published on: Apr 16, 2018

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