Embryology

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Please see the schedule below. 

Space is limited so contact Spencer today to RSVP!  (435) 586-8132

When selecting a date please try to get at least 5 classrooms at your school.  This will be safer for the embryos.  Less travel time and exposure to cooler temperatures.

Please see below the schedule for detailed information about our program:

Please let me know if you have any comments, suggestions or concerns about this calendar.

Thank you so much for your support and I look forward to hangin’ with my peeps!

                  4-H Embryology 2014

Phase 1

 

 

Incubator Delivery

Wednesday

2.12.2014

Egg Delivery

Friday

2.14

Eggs Hatch

Wednesday

2.19

Incubator Pick Up

Friday

2.21

 

 

 

Phase 2

 

 

Incubator Delivery

Wednesday

2.26.2014

Egg Delivery

Friday

2.28

Eggs Hatch

Wednesday

3.5

Incubator Pick Up

Friday

3.7

 

 

 

Phase 3

 

 

Incubator Delivery

Wednesday

3.12.2014

Egg Delivery

Friday

3.14

Eggs Hatch

Wednesday

3.19

Incubator Pick Up

Friday

3.21

 

 

 

Phase 4

 

 

Incubator Delivery

Monday

3.24.2014

Egg Delivery

Wednesday

3.26

Eggs Hatch

Monday

3.31

Incubator Pick Up

Wednesday

4.2

 

 

 

Phase 5

Incubator Delivery

Friday

4.4.2014

Egg Delivery

Monday

4.7

Eggs Hatch

Friday

4.11

Incubator Pick Up

Monday

4.14

 

 

 

Phase 6

 

 

Incubator Delivery

Friday

4.25.2014

Egg Delivery

Monday

4.28

Eggs Hatch

Friday

5.2

Incubator Pick Up

Monday

5.5

 

 

 

Phase 7

 

 

Incubator Delivery

Wednesday

5.14.2014

Egg Delivery

Friday

5.16

Eggs Hatch

Wednesday

5.21

Incubator Pick Up

Friday

5/23

If you are interested in hatching in the Summer of 2014 in your homeschool, 4-H Family or Community Club please contact me as soon as possible to make arrangements.

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This is the best heritage egg laying breed. The Leghorn is a single comb, clean legged variety that originated in Italy. Standard white plumage throughout. Hardy, but combs subject to frostbite in extreme cold weather areas. Leghorns are a flighty breed, very nervous and non broody.

Egg color - Excellent producer of large white eggs. Produces 250 Eggs Per Year
Purpose - Layer
Weight: Female- 4.5 lb. Male 6 lb.
$2 each
 
Will be ready for a brooder beginning the week of February 20th. We will have continuous hatchings through the end of May. Plenty of chicks for all your egg and chicken needs. If you are interested in learning more about how you can raise your own chicken eggs for your family call us now and we can hold a workshop.
 
Order yours today!!
 
Our 4-H Embryology program offers youth the opportunity to hatch chickens in their 4-H Clubs, Family 4-H Clubs, and classrooms. If you would like to participate in this program please contact me. Space and supplies are limited. I will be glad to provide additional information!!!
 


Dear Embryology Participant:

Thank you for your interest in this program.  To make your experience more memorable and worthwhile, please read your packet and complete surveys!  The information presented here is to help you in every way possible.  There are suggestions for learning activities, proper instructions for care of the eggs and chicks, and many facts about the poultry industry and importance of chickens. 

There are a few things to remember when participating in the embryology program: 

·         Completely fill out your survey!  This is a great way for us to receive feedback about the packet and/or the program. 

·         You are responsible for cleaning your own incubator.  Please have it cleaned and ready at the scheduled pick-up time.  To clean it, simply unplug it, discard any unhatched eggs (they will not hatch after 2 days, so it is okay to do this), wash all egg shells out of the screen and base (using hot soapy water and bleach), dry the base with a paper towel and reassemble the incubator. Please do not use boiling water as it will melt the incubator.

Please feel free to contact me with any questions.  The 4-H Office phone number is (435) 586-8132 and my email address is spencer.kohler@usu.edu.  Thank you for your cooperation and good luck with your eggs!


4-H Embryology Program

General Instructions 

  1. Location of Incubator

·         Ideal room conditions are 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit.

·         Place the incubator away from drafts, out of direct sunlight and on an inside wall if possible.

·         Be sure to make the custodians aware that the incubator must stay plugged in at all times.

  1. Start and Regulate the Incubator:

·         Assemble the incubator and plug it in at least 12 hours prior to the eggs arriving.

·         Maintain the temperature at approximately 100 degrees, (provided incubators should be adjusted when received, however, it is good to check this).  Thermometer is to be in a horizontal position.  If your incubator is experiencing problems maintaining the temperature please contact your Extension Office immediately.

·         Keep in incubator water reservoirs filled at all times.  When adding water, use warm distilled water.  You must provide your own distilled water which is available at any grocery store.

  1. Setting the Eggs

·         Place the eggs in the incubator.  Eggs may have cooled a bit and will take a few hours to warm back up. 

  1. Incubating the eggs

·          The eggs are arriving 18-19 days into incubation.  They do not need to be turned at this point.

·         Limit the number of times you open the incubator.  Opening the incubator will decrease the humidity and make it more difficult for chicks to peck through.  Keep a close eye on the thermometer

  1. Setting up the Brooder

·         Set up the brooder on the first day, so that it is ready for the chicks.  This is where the hatched chicks will live until they are picked up.

·         Use a plastic container and place pine wood chips in the bottom, about 1” deep.  Do not use newspaper because this will cause spraddled legs.  Do not use cedar shavings because it causes health problems with the chicks.

·         Fill the watering container with water and fill the feed dish full with feed provided.

·         Clamp a heat lamp or a desk lamp to the plastic container or a table edge and direct the light to one end of the box.  This will allow chicks to regulate their own body temperature.  If you notice the chicks huddled in a pile under the light they are cold and may need to be moved to a warmer location or the light may need to be closer to the chicks.  If chicks are all in the opposite end of the brooder, as far from the heat source as possible, they are too hot.  Typically the brooder should be around 95-98 degrees Fahrenheit.

  1. When Chicks Hatch

·         Chicks will begin pipping (pecking through the shell) around the 21st day of incubation.

·         Pipping may take place for one to six hours, do not assist the chicks by pulling at the shell.

·         After emerging from the shell, the chicks will dry, become strong and begin to move about.  This may take four to six hours. It is very important to leave the chicks in the incubator until they are completely dry.

·         After the hatched chicks are dry, place them in the brooder.

  1. Pick up Procedures

·         Please condense all hatched chicks to one brooder.  Take out the water and feed and leave the lamp on until just before the scheduled pick up time.

·         Place all the non-pipping eggs in a grocery bag.

·         Wash the incubators in bleach if available. Use a damp rag to wipe out the lids.  Do not submerge the lids.

·         Empty all the water containers and feed containers and clean.

·         Please have all items to be picked up in one central location, at the arranged pick up time.

·         Please be sure to complete the survey and return it at pick up.

  1. Contact Information

·         Questions will arise during this project.  Please feel free to contact:

o    Angela Hackwell, Iron County 4-H Coordinator

§   Iron County Extension Office  (435) 586-8132

 Please teach good sanitation by having children wash their hands after handling the chicks or equipment.

Thank you for taking the time, and making the effort, to enrich your curriculum with this great opportunity.  Your students are so fortunate to have caring teachers like yourself!


CARE OF SICK AND DEFORMED CHICKS

Answers to the most commonly asked questions

  1. Is it something I did or didn’t do?

The first thing to remember is that it is NOT your fault!  Sickness and deformities are very common illnesses in chickens.  These are things beyond your control.

  1. What kinds of deformities could I see?

Some very common deformities are undersized wings, crooked necks, and displaced hips.  If a chick has displaced hips, it will look as if it is walking on its knees, and will do so with great difficulty. 

 

  1. What kinds of sicknesses could I see?

You may see listlessness, lack of appetite and a general weakness in a sick chick.  This usually happens with the weaker chicks or those who have been exposed to a cold or disease.  If a student is sick (i.e., cold, flu, etc.), it is a good idea to keep him or her away from the chicks. 

  1. Should I separate the chick from the others?

This is a decision you must make.  To allow the chick unhindered access to the feed and water, you may want to consider separating it. 

** NOTE:  Chickens can be cannibalistic!  If any of the chicks start to bleed, it is a good idea to separate it, as the others may continue to peck at it.  **

  1. Will the chick lead a normal life?

Chicks that are sick or deformed do not survive.  If someone were to care for them, they would probably still perish.  For example, if a chick has displaced hips, as it gains weight, more pressure is added to its hips and knees.  Eventually, this causes a dislocation and becomes infected.  This is just nature’s way of taking care of weaker individuals.