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I have a lumpy yard. I have used a roller to flatten it with litte success I have also aerated and put seed as well and fertalizer down. What else can be done beforeI have to bring in a bobcat and start over?

Answer(s)

A

If the "lumps" are caused by earthworm castings, see the USU Extension publication on this topic at http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/factsheet/HG_Lawn_2005-01.pdf

If you're having trouble with pocket gophers, see the publication at http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/NR_WS_005.pdf

Lawns that have been taken over by clump-type grasses may also feel lumpy. In this case, you may need to start over. Use a vertical mower then re-seed with a good turfgrass cultivar. See the USU Extension publication on turfgrass cultivars at http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/HG_Grass_2004_01.pdf

Aerating and top-dressing with fine-texture organic matter will  help even out the soil surface over time.

 

Posted on 19 Apr 2007

Maggie Wolf
Horticulture Agent, Salt Lake County

Answer(s)

A

If you have a lot of bumps/lumps in your turf but they aren’t caused by earthworms, there are only a few other things I can think of that would be causing the lumps.
One possibility is that a bunch-type grass has taken over your lawn. Some rye and fescue grass cultivars grow as bunch grasses. Are the “lumps” actually mounds of growing grass?
Another possibility is pocket gopher tunnels collapsing. Even if you are rid of the gophers (and you see no big mounds of dirt from their tunnel entrance/exits), their tunnels eventually collapse and the soil surface becomes uneven.
Similarly, tree roots from old trees that were removed in the recent past may be rotting away and the soil is sinking lower where roots once were.
 

Posted on 23 Apr 2007

Maggie Wolf
Horticulture Agent, Salt Lake County

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