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I have read that one should water infrequently and then water to penetrate 6 to 10 inches especially if one has necrotic ring spot. I live in Sandy where the top soil is only four inches and then sand and rock. Does it make sense to water 6 to 8 inches? Also does necrotic ring spot live in sandy rocky soil? Is it possible to control or eliminate the necrotic ring spot by using a service or must I excavate and if so to what extent?

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For most lawns it does make sense to water them less frequently and to have the water penetrate 6-8 inches if possible.   Watering in this way will help your grass develop deep roots, help your lawn outcompete weeds and keep your lawn looking full and lush.  Every lawn is unique but you can adapt this type of watering, to you best ability, to fit your specific conditions including sandy soil.  Below I have included a link to a fact on caring for your lawn that will give you some more information. 

http://extension.usu.edu/files/publications/publication/HG_517.pdf

The most important thing that you can do for your lawn to manage necrotic ring spot is to reduce the stress on your lawn.  Maintain balanced fertilization, paying special attention to nitrogen, phosphorous and potassium.  To find out the levels of these nutrient in your lawn you can send a soil sample to the Utah State University Analytical Lab.  I have included the link to their webpage that will give you more information.

www.usual.usu.edu


Another stress to avoid with necrotic ring spot is drought stress.  Normally it is recommended to water in the manner I have already described; however, to help manage this disease especially in the hot summer months you may need to water your lawn more frequently so the lawn can survive, especially in afternoon heat. Having said this it is also very important that you do not overwater your lawn.  I have included a link that will give you much more information regarding necrotic ring spot.

http://extension.usu.edu/htm/publications/publication=8719

Posted on 23 Apr 2008

Heidi Wayman
Horticulture Intern, Salt Lake County

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