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Is there a variety of Nectarine which will grow well here in northern Utah? Can I grow just one tree? Is it okay to grow it near a peach tree or will they cross-pollinate and cause problems? Do they have the same risk of disease as peaches do?

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A

A couple of varieties you might consider for northern Utah are Red Gold andStark Delicious.  These are both freestone varieties of nectarines.  Red Gold and Stark Delicious are self-fruitful so doesn't need cross
pollination.

Here is a list of recommended varieties for northern Utah - follow this link
http://www.larrysagers.com/weeklyarticles/recommended_peach_and_nectarine_varieties_for_northern_utah.html


Nectarines and peaches prefer well drained soil, and most of our heavy clay soils are not ideal but fruit trees can work. Peaches or nectarines require full sunlight and should not receive shade from buildings or tall trees. If
possible, select a site with a high elevation so that cold air can drain away from the tree on a cold night during bloom. The best site will have well drained sandy loam type soil. Peach or nectarine tree roots or rootstocks will not tolerate soils where water remains on or near the surface for more than one hour after a heavy rain.

Prepare the soil one to two years before planting so that soil pH, organic matter, and nutrient status can be modified for the production of high quality peaches and/or nectarines. Prepare a bed at least 5 to 6 feet in diameter by cultivating (spading) 10 to 12 inches deep and adding organic matter such as manure, leaves, grass clippings, and compost. Always a good idea to know your soil and if you have not had your soil analyzed, USUAL (Utah State University Analytical Laboratory) can do a basic soil test for $14.  Go to http://www.usual.usu.edu/index.html

Soil Test Form
http://www.usual.usu.edu/forms/soilform.2003.pdf

As for cross pollination with peaches - usually not a problem. From Colorado State University Extension fact sheet:  Self-unfruitful varieties of peaches are J.H. Hale, Earlihale, Hal-Berta, Candoka and Mikado (June Elberta). Most
other varieties of peaches will pollinate these self-unfruitful varieties. However, Elberta is not a good pollinizer for J.H. Hale.

Posted on 11 Sep 2007

Maggie Shao
Horticulture Agent, Salt Lake County

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