Weather

    Live Well Utah

    UPCOMING EVENTS

    View full calendar

    Weather

    Q

    Is there a website I can go to in order to get a daily ET rate for the Farmington/Kaysville area?

    A

    To find a daily ET (evapotranspiration) rate, go tohttp://www.conservewater.utah.gov/et/etsite/summary.htm

    and then look at the weather station names on the left hand side.  Click on the station name that is closest to the area you are interested in.  This will bring up the daily ET information.  The station closest to Kaysville would be Weber Basin Water in Layton. 

    Shawn Olsen
    Davis County Office
    Utah State University Extension
    Phone: 801-451-3402
    Fax: 801-451-3572
    E-mail: shawn.olsen@usu.edu
    28 East State Street
    P.O. Box 618
    Farmington, UT 84025-0618 

    Posted on 17 Mar 2008

    Shawn Olsen
    County Director, Agriculture Davis County

    Q

    The news of the Milford Flats fire said that the radiation detected was a result of the intense heat causing radon to be released. Is that the truth? Or is the detected increase in radiation (perhaps in the form of radon) caused by the stirring up of fallout from nuclear tests of the past four decades?

    A

    I have checked with several leaders in Beaver County and no one has heard of radiation detected in Beaver County during or since the fire.
    If radiation had been detected I don't think there is any way of knowing where it came from.

     

    Posted on 20 Aug 2007

    Mark Nelson
    County Director, Agriculture and 4-H/Youth Agent, Beaver county

     

    Spring Yard Care

    Q

    Do you have tips on early spring lawn and yard care?

    A

    In early spring, you can reduce the tangle of weeds that appear in your yard, prune your trees, reduce garden pests and help your lawn become healthy and green. Proper care of your lawn in the spring will help promote a healthy landscape throughout the year. Consider these tips.

    • Core aeration, where small plugs are removed from the soil, has proven to be more beneficial to turf than power raking, which was a common yard care technique several years ago. Aerating allows better air, water and fertilizer penetration into the soil. It also helps reduce the thatch layer and minimizes compaction that produces unhealthy roots. It can be done any time the ground is free from snow. Heavily used areas and clay soils may need to be aerated twice a year, once in the spring and again in the fall. Normal soil types and use areas are usually fine with one aeration in the spring, and sandy soils only need it every two years.
    • If a fall fertilizer was applied last year, the grass may not need it again until mid or late- May. If there was no fall application, a fertilizer high in nitrogen can be applied now. Consider using a slow release fertilizer, such as sulfur-coated urea. These fertilizers are more expensive, but only need to be applied every two to three months to keep the lawn looking green and lush.
    • You can begin mowing your grass as soon as it starts to grow, leaving it between 2 1/2 to 3 inches tall. You should begin watering when the lawn looks dry or begins to show early symptoms of water stress.
    • Weeds, such as spurge, crabgrass and foxtail, are common in July and August and should be controlled in the spring since they are nearly impossible to remove midsummer. Weeds germinate and are small in the spring so they go unnoticed. Nip them in the bud by applying a pre-emergent such as Galleria, Halt or Dacthal to the lawn now and then again in early June. These products must be applied before the weeds begin to germinate since they kill the young germinating annuals, not the established weeds.
    • Cleaning up debris around the yard and garden will help keep pests under control. They love to hide under old dead plant material and organic matter. Controlling the first generation of most insects greatly reduces their number throughout the summer. A clean garden eliminates a breeding area or a place for insects to gather.
    • Control broadleaf weeds in early May with a broadleaf weed killer. These weeds include dandelions, clover, black medic and chickweed. They need to be treated before the weather warms to above 85 degrees.
    • When trimming ornamental and shade trees, remember that the tree limbs and branches will stay at the same height for the entire life of the tree. The growing point for the tree is located in the top terminal bud, and the rest of the tree will only grow in circumference. If the branch is four feet off the ground today, it will be four feet off the ground in 20 years.
    • You can safely prune most trees through the end of May. Most pruning is done before the tree leafs out because it is easier to see where to prune and easier to get into the tree. I recommend pruning in March and early April.
    • Do very little pruning on ornamental trees. Prune wood that is dead, diseased or injured and branches that cross (rub), grow back into the center of the tree or are out of place. Be sure to keep the natural shape of the tree intact.

    Posted on 8 Mar 2001

    Jerry Goodspeed
    County Director, Horticulture Agent, Weber County

    Q

    How do i get rid of morning glory?

    A

    The true answer is: you don't. But you can slow it down and manage it. 

    Field bindweed, often called morning glory, is indeed enjoying the hot summer we are having this year. It is just the edge it needs to compete more effectively against the cool season grass lawns most of us grow. As with any weed management, irrigation practices are important, although less so with this weed, since it grows from roots. But it also produces seed which can germinate and grow quickly in the right situation.

    Water lawns only as often as absolutely necessary. By allowing the top one inch of soil to dry between irrigation, you are killing any weed seeds that are sprouting immediately after the irrigation. Train the Turfgrass to grow deeper roots by wetting the soil at least 8 inches deep every time you irrigate. Test it by digging a hole and looking at the soil or by poking a long screwdriver down into the lawn - the dry soil begins when you meet resistance. Thatch buildup creates a good place for weeds to germinate, because this spongy layer between grass blades and the soil retains water longer than soil would. If thatch is thicker than one-half inch, core aerate this fall or late summer (once hot temperatures subside). Too much nitrogen fertilization can lead to thatch buildup, because grass is growing faster than the clippings and dead roots can decompose. Also, don't forget to raise the mower deck so that the soil surface is more shaded, this will discourage weed growth there. Taller grass plants grow deeper roots, so you can go even longer between irrigations thus allowing the soil surface and/or thatch layer to dry out and kill weed seed that may be germinating.

    Review the USU Extension publication "Basic Turfgrass Care" and make sure that your lawn care company is following the maintenance guidelines therein. You can download that publication at 

    http://extension.usu.edu/files/gardpubs/hg517.pdf

    When temperatures are cool enough (80 daytime max), and bindweed is in the lawn, you can spray it with an herbicide containing 2,4-D. You cannot spray these weedkillers while temperatures reach above 80 for one or two days after spraying, because the chemical will volatilize and float over to nearby plants and damage them. In areas where there aren’t any other desired plants, you can spray bindweed with a broad spectrum herbicide containing glyphosate (like Roundup).http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7462.html

    Bindweed is really loving our hot weather, because our Kentucky bluegrass is heat stressed and not competing well. A vigorous, healthy lawn can usually out-compete bindweed.  Three to four inches of mulch over soil will keep bindweed under control, too.

     

    Maggie Wolf

    Utah State University Extension

    Horticulture and Technology Agent

     

    This weed is correctly called field bindweed.  It is a very difficult and persistent problem.  The plant propagates by seed and underground rhizomes.  Early “weeding” of young plants reduces and sometimes eliminates their growth.  However, established plants with a deep root system are extremely hard to control and a broadleaf weed killer should be applied during the blooming season or in the fall after the first frost. 
    Recommendation:  Grow a vigorous lawn to compete against bindweed, or apply mulch 3 inches deep over it.  Occasionally pull sprouts or spot-treat with perennial-rate glyphosate.

    Karl Hauptfleisch

    Utah State University Extension

    Master Gardener 

    Posted on 17 Mar 2008

    Maggie Wolf
    Horticulture Agent, Salt Lake County
    Karl Hauptfleisch
    Salt Lake Master Gardener
    Q

    How often should I use the mulching blade in my mower? Is every time I mow OK?

    A

    Mulching blades may be used every time you mow as long as the lawn is not allowed to get too long between mowings. In the spring, when the grass is rapidly growing, you will need to mow more frequently or bag or rake the clippings. When the grass becomes high or you try to cut off too much at one time, the mulch blade cannot do its job. Later in the summer when it is hot and the grass slows down, it is not a problem.

    Posted on 12 Apr 2001

    Rick Heflebower
    Horticulture Agent, Washington County 

    Q

    I have been searching for a Globe Maple (globosum) for my landscape. I can't find this tree anywhere and I am quite desperate and would appreciate any help you could give me in locating one.

    A

    There are several different maple species with cultivars called "Globosum." They include Norway Maple, Red Maple, and Sugar Maple. If you are in Utah, the tree you want is: Acer platanoides "Globosum" (Norway Maple variety Globosum). If you can't find it in stock, you should be able to go to any full-service nursery and ask them to order one for you."

    Posted on 12 Apr 2001

    Larry Rupp
    Program Leader and Landscape Horticulture Specialist

    Q

    Last October we purchased three 7-foot pine trees from a nursery. We planted them successfully in our yard. I just noticed this weekend that some of the branches towards the bottom look like they're dying (turning color, appear to be drying out). Is this normal after winter? Or would it be a sign that the trees haven't received enough water during the winter?

    A

    It depends on which needles are dying. If it is the older needles (those closer to the center of the tree) you are probably okay. If the young needles near the tips of the branches are dying, then there is most likely a problem. At this point, I would recommend that you wait until spring and see if there is healthy new growth from the tips. It is not uncommon to have some stress during transplanting, but if you get good new growth you should be okay. Conifers can dry out during the winter, and it is hard to say without knowing your local conditions. In general most pines should be okay unless we get a cold, windy winter with little precipitation.

    Posted on 12 Apr 2001

    Larry Rupp
    Program Leader and Landscape Horticulture Specialist

    Q

    What can you tell me about Turtle Grass--value, strengths, weaknesses, how and where to plant, etc?

    A

    Turtle Grass is fairly new to us here in southern Utah. There are some pros and cons. It requires less water and fertilizer to maintain good color. However, It does not appear to be as durable (doesn't repair itself well )as bluegrass or tall fescue, so it would not be a good choice for a backyard, for example, where children would be playing. USDA researchers indicate that it would probably do well in an arid climate but, in places of high humidity it may not have good disease tolerance.
    It is something we hope to do a little testing with here in the future. Turtle Grass sod is fairly expensive (almost double the price of regular sod).

    Posted on 12 Apr 2001

    Rick Heflebower
    Horticulture Agent, Washington County 

    Q

    Will the Prairie cultivar of Buffalo grass do well in the Grantsville (Tooele County) area? If not, which grass would be best for a new home? My goal is to conserve water and minimize the number of mowings each summer. Also would you recommend Meyer Zoysia grass for this area?

    A

    The cultivars that you noted are not the best for this area. The winter may kill the Prairie cultivar of Buffalo grass. A better choice would be 609 or Legacy. 609 will remain green longer than Legacy and you would water them normally about every 10 to 14 days during the hot part of the summer. They both will brown earlier in the fall than Kentucky Blue and stay brown longer in the spring than Kentucky Blue. Zoysia grass of any kind is not recommended for this climate. They are warm season grasses and do not do well here.

    Posted on 12 Apr 2001

    Wade Bitner
    Horticulture Agent Salt Lake County