Preserve the Harvest

    Preserve the Harvest

    Apples

    apple

    Apples are a favorite fruit of many people for eating out of hand, in fresh salads, or in a wide variety of cooked products. Instructions on preserving apples. 

    More Information

    Apricots

    apricots

    Today, the United States produces close to 90% of the world’s apricots, most being grown in California. Apricots are an excellent source of betacarotene (vitamin A) and also provide vitamin C, iron, potassium, and fiber. Instructions on preserving apricots.

    More Information

    Berries

    Berries

    The American colonists invented strawberry shortcake. An early name for blackberry was brambleberry or bramble. Don’t wash berries until close to time to eat them. They tend to rot if held moist. Instructions on preserving berries.

    More Information

    Cherries

    Cherries

    Cherries are grouped according to taste into sweet and sour types. Within each of these groups, cherries are classified on the basis of the color and firmness of their flesh. Instructions on preserving cherries.

    More Information 

    Chile

    Placeholder Image

    Chile comes in many varieties: from 1/4 inch to 12 inches long, very mild to extremely hot, and in red, green, yellow or almost black. The best way to preserve chile depends on how you plan to use it and your available storage space. Instructions on preserving chilies.

    More Information

    Corn

    Placeholder Image

    Corn is not only a favorite vegetable, but it is also the source of corn starch, cornmeal, corn oil, corn syrup, bourbon, and laundry starch. Instructions on preserving corn.

    More Information

    Figs

    Placeholder Image

    The history of figs dates back over 2000 years to when the Greeks considered the fig to be “more precious than gold.” Figs have been used to treat boils, stomach aches, skin disease and have been helpful to those wishing to stop smoking. Instructions on preserving figs.

    More Information

    Grapes

    Placeholder Image

    Botanically speaking, grapes are a form of berry. High quality grapes are plump, well formed and firmly attached to green, pliable stems. Fully ripe grapes are soft and tender. Instructions on preserving grapes.

    More Information

    Pears

    Placeholder Image

    There are over 5,000 varieties of pears. The most popular variety is Bartlett pears available the first two weeks in September in Utah. Instructions on preserving pears. 

    More Information

    Pole and Bush Beans

    Placeholder Image

    The most popular variety is Bartlett pears available the first two weeks in September in Utah. There are many good bean varieties for sale in local gardening outlets and through seed catalogs. Instructions on preserving pole and bush beans. 

    More Information

    Pomegranates

    Placeholder Image

    The pomegranate is a native fruit of the Middle East. Its name in Latin means “apple with many seeds,” but it actually looks somewhat like a petrified tomato. The edible portion of the fruit includes the seed and the juicy translucent flesh covering the seed. Instructions on preserving pomegranates.

    More Information

    Tomatoes

    Placeholder Image

    Tomatoes that have been ripened before they are picked have the best flavor. Shipped tomatoes are often picked green and allowed to ripen off the vine. Tomatoes can be preserved by freezing, canning, or drying with good results. For best results peel tomatoes before preserving. Instructions on preserving tomatoes.

    More Information

    Summer Squash

    Placeholder Image

    Most varieties of summer squash do well throughout Utah. All squash prefer organic, rich, well-drained, sandy soils for best growth. Instructions on preserving summer squash. 

    More Information

    Venison

    Placeholder Image

    The term “venison” originally referred to the edible flesh of any wild animal. During the Middle Ages in England, it referred to the flesh of any animal killed in the hunt. Venison jerky is a nutritious, convenient meat product you can make safely at home. Instructions on preserving venison. 

    More Information

    Zucchini

    Placeholder Image

    A serving of zucchini provides 30% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C. In Mexico the flower is preferred over the vegetable, and is often cooked in soups or used as a filling for quesadillas. Instructions on preserving zucchini. 

    More Information